fairytalemood:

YA Retellings brought to you by Epic Reads - Fairy Tale Retellings:

Beauty and the Beast: East by Edith Pattou / Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow by Jessica Day George / Rose Daughter by Robin McKinley / Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge / Spirited by Nancy Holder / Heart’s Blood by Juliet Marillier / The Princess and the Hound by Mette Ivie Harrison / Stung by Bethany Wiggins / The Hollow Kingdom by Clare B. Dunkle / Beastly by Alex Flinn / Beauty by Robin McKinley / Of Beast and Beauty by Stacey Jay

The Little Mermaid: September Girls by Bennett Madison / Fathomless by Jackson Pearce / Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama / Midnight Pearls by Cameron Dokey / Mermaid: A Twist on a Classic Tale by Carolyn Turgeon

Cinderella: Just Ella by Margaret Peterson Haddix / Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine / Princess of Glass by Jessica Day George / Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas / If I have A Wicked Stepmother, Where’s My Prince? by Melissa Kantor / Gilded Ashes by Rosamund Hodge / Shadows on the Moon by Zoe Marriott / Cinder by Marissa Meyer / Before Midnight by Cameron Dokey / Ash by Malinda Lo

Rumpelstiltskin: A Curse As Dark As Gold by Elizabeth C. Bunce / Spinners by Donna Jo Napoli / The Crimson Thread by Suzanne Weyn

The Frog Prince: Cloaked by Alex Flinn / Enchanted by Alethea Kontis / The Door in the Hedge by Robin McKinley / Water Song by Suzanne Weyn

The Snow Queen: Cold Spell by Jackson Pearce / Winter’s Child by Cameron Dokey / Stork by Wendy Delsol

Little Red Riding Hood: Red Riding Hood by Sarah Blakley-Cartwright / Scarlet by Marissa Meyer / The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly / Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce / Scarlet Moon by Debbie Viguié / Dust City by Robert Paul Weston

Twelve Dancing Princesses: Entwined by Heather Dixon / The Phoenix Dance by Dia Calhoun / The Night Dance by Suzanne Weyn / Princess of the Midnight Ball by Jessica Day George / Wildwood Dancing by Juliet Marillier

Hansel and Gretel: Sweetly by Jackson Pearce / Bewitching by Alex Flinn / Greta and the Goblin King by Chloe Jacobs

Rapunzel: Bitter Greens by Kate Forsyth / Rapunzel Untangled by Cindy C. Bennett / Towering by Alex Flinn / Cress by Marissa Meyer / Golden by Cameron Dokey / Zel by Donna Jo Napoli

Snow White: Beauty by Nancy Ohlin / Snow by Tracy Lynn / The Glass Casket by McCormick Templeman / The Rose and the Beast by Francesca Lia Block / The Serpent’s Shadow by Mercedes Lackey / Nameless by Lili St. Crow / Fairest by Gail Carson Levine / Tender Morsels by Margo Lanagan (*this is actually a retelling of “Snow White and Rose Red”) / Devoured by Amanda Marrone

Sleeping Beauty: A Kiss in Time by Alex Flinn / Briar Rose by Jane Yolen / Beauty Sleep by Cameron Dokey / Princess of Thorns by Stacey Jay / The Healer’s Apprentice by Melanie Dickerson / Spindle’s End by Robin McKinley / Kill Me Softly by Sarah Cross / A Long, Long Sleep by Anna Sheehan


Do you think I’m wonderful? she asked him one day as they leaned against the trunk of a petrified maple. No, he said. Why? Because so many girls are wonderful. I imagine hundreds of men have called their loves wonderful today, and it’s only noon. You couldn’t be something that hundreds of others are.



We work in our own darkness a great deal with little real knowledge of what we are doing.
John Steinbeck, from “The Art of Fiction, No. 45,” The Paris Review (Fall 1969, No. 48)


hermionejg:

Los seres humanos no nacen para siempre el día en que sus madres los alumbran, sino que la vida los obliga a parirse a sí mismos una y otra vez.

- Gabriel García Márquez (March 6, 1927-April 17th, 2014)

[human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves]




He allowed himself to be swayed by his conviction that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves.
Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez, Love in the Time of Cholera (via fuckyeahexistentialism)

That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don’t know nothing about it.
Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (via bookmania)


ofiscariot:

literature meme (origin): 5/8 short stories series. a series of unfortunate events, lemony snicket.

"The world is a harum-scarum place."

"Harum?" Sunny asked.

"It’s complicated and confusing," Olivia explained. "They say that long ago, it was simple and quiet, but that might be a legend." (from The Carnivorous Carnival)




It’s you and I,
Sightseeing around the oldest town in Texas
With its brick buildings
That look like infants next to the ancient atoms in our skin.
Holding hands through moss-covered alleyways,
We are older than the cracked foundations and sullied windowpanes.
There are words on our tongues that could make the Parthenon
Feel young again.
We are old on the inside,
Where the last wheeze of a dying star
Still echoes through the universe,
masked by the sounds of our voice.

It’s you and I.
I am in your mouth; I am curled up
Next to your bones
And they hum my name the way
Gregorian monks sing of God.
I wonder if they’ve always known me—
If every cell in your body has just been waiting for me
To come home.
I tell them I am here now.
I let my bones sing with your bones.
We are the kind of harmonies that make the moon rise, at night.
We are the reason the tide comes in.

It’s you and I.
When they write of young lovers,
They are writing about the way your body feels against mine, in the dark.
Your mouth loved me better than any god.
I was the altar you lay prostrate in front of;
You were the confessional where my sins
Grew tongues and learned to talk.

We are ancient, you and I.
We are clumsy newborns with curious hands.
We are the stars that caught fire in the cosmos
Generations before the Earth pressed it’s molten clay together.
Once—we were the youngest creatures to ever exist.
Now, we are poets and landmines.
We are volatile and reckless and in love.
Ashe Vernon, “Old Souls” (via underwaternow)

and when you kissed me,
fifteen wild Decembers
melted into spring
Emily Bronte, Remembrance (via queensmilitant)



Water is the softest thing, yet it can penetrate mountains and earth. This shows clearly the principle of softness overcoming hardness.
Lao Tzu (via cosmofilius)



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